As part of the promotion for the release of LINKIN PARK’s brand new album “A Thousand Suns,” the band has come up with a unique promotional strategy. Fans are being greeted by messages like  “LINKIN PARK needs your help at http://linkinpark.com/. Here’s a hint: #athousandsuns” at the band’s Facebook Page.

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Visiting LINKIN PARK’s official website, a screen with the message “HELP ME” appears.

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One click makes way for another message “PLEASE SET ME FREE. CONVERSATION IS THE KEY,” with an option to connect to the user’s Twitter account.

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After connecting to the user’s Twitter account through their homepage, the following screen is visible:

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This allows the user to enter a message with #AThousandSuns hashtag, which once entered, plays a very brief sound bite of what could be “The Catalyst” (just a guess) along with the following message:

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Now amidst all this, the question arises: To what end? The possibility that LINKIN PARK aim to make #AThousandSuns the #1 Trending Topic (TT) on Twitter seems ridiculously lame & naive. My guess – when the total number of Tweets reach a particular number, the band will release something important. Since they can’t possibly release a song before their first single “The Catalyst” is out on August 2 (judging by their history), that points only toward one direction – Artwork. And since the artwork for “The Catalyst” has already been revealed, that leads to the only obvious conclusion:

We are setting the artwork for “A Thousand Suns” free by tweeting. Conversation Is The Key. Mystery Solved.

However, this remains only a calculated guess at this moment. But even if I’m wrong, whatever it is that all LINKIN PARK fans are setting free, it better be well worth the effort.

As for the promotional strategy, this is undoubtedly an innovative concept. Pretty simple actually –  sooner the desired number of fan tweets is achieved, sooner would the artwork (or whatever) arrive. But most importantly, involving the fans, that too in such a huge number, makes the concept tailor made to facilitate peer-to-peer promotion. And the mystery associated with the whole project leads to further added interest. All in all, irrespective of what the end result turns out to be, the band would have succeeded in catching the headlines everywhere and in turn creating unparalleled interest for the release of their new album. One hell of a way to promote, I’d say. And I wouldn’t be too surprised if the whole idea would eventually turn out to be Mike Shinoda’s brainchild.

Linkin Park


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